Joseph Farrugia, Director General of the Malta Employers Association

The Malta Employers Association (MEA) have stressed the need for employers to have assurances about how to handle employees who opt not to be vaccinated “without justifiable reason”.

In addition, the MEA called for a legislative framework and clear guidelines with regards vaccination at the workplace.

At a webinar on the issue, the MEA said that in cases where staff who cannot work remotely and are refusing to get the jab “without justifiable reason”, the MEA added:

“Whilst employees will be exercising their right not to vaccinate – since till now it is not mandatory – employers also have a duty to protect the workplace and other employees from infection, by having such employees undergo mandatory, regular testing”.

“The frequency of testing should be determined by the health authorities. Any related costs, including work assessments to accommodate such persons are to be carried by the employee. Moreover, quarantine leave should not be paid by the employer in such cases. Employers should also be able to ask for certification of vaccination prior to employing someone.”

The MEA’s webinar on vaccinations at the workplace was addressed by MEA officials and representatives from the Department for Industrial and Employment Relations, the Occupational Health and Safety Authority, and the Department of Public Health.

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Joseph Farrugia, Director General of the Malta Employers Association

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