Imports of single-use plastics

The importation of single-use plastics to Malta to come to an end this Friday 1st January as measures to prevent pollution come into effect. 

This follows the completion of the public consultation and publication of legal notices on the 30th of December 2020, Minister for the Environment, Climate Change and Planning Aaron Farrugia announced.  

Malta will be amongst the first countries to ban certain single-use plastic products in the EU. The ban will apply to products such as plastic bags, cutlery, straws, plates, cotton buds, food containers, and stirrers.  

The Minister said that the implementation of the measure is ongoing, and all is according to plan.

“It is high time that we give answers to our children who ask about all the litter on our beaches, who see photos of washed-up seagulls with stomachs full of plastic products, and injured turtles caught up in plastic bags.”

“We will continue to work to decrease pollution, launch our climate change strategy, improve our health and that of our ecosystems, with tangible results,” he continued. 

“This year will be a transitory one for the single-use plastic products already on the market and, as from 2022,  the sale and distribution of these items will also be legally prohibited. We are doing this with determination, as families in Malta want the environment at the top of the government’s agenda post-COVID.”

“At the same time, the process is fully transparent in order to provide certainty to industry,” Minister Farrugia said. 

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