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The Malta Chamber of Commerce, Enterprise and Industry has appealed to the political class to take note of the serious repercussions of poor standards of governance and unethical behaviour by politicians that are currently coming to the fore.

The statement follows recent revelations surrounding the relationship of MP Rosianne Cutajar, and Yorgen Fenech, alleged mastermind behind the murder of the journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia, and former head of Tumas Group.

“Persons in public office need to be mindful of the fact that, irrespective of their right to a private life, when unethical behaviour becomes public knowledge, their position in public office becomes untenable,” read the statement.

“This is why persons in public office should strive to maintain high standards of behaviour in both their public as well as their private life.”

The Malta Chamber expressed its disappointment at the handling of the current crisis of standards in public life, which is allowing the country to go through another spiral of reputational damage.

It said that this is extremely unfair on the many politicians and private citizens who abide by high ethical standards and continue to work hard in the best interests of the country. It warned that reputational damage hurts international business prospects and the livelihood of many.

“The political price of shenanigans at the highest institutions of the country is ultimately paid by the country as a whole, multiple times over. It is high time the highest authorities of the country step up and clean up for real.”

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