Members of Air Malta’s old Flypass loyalty scheme still need to collect €808,000 from the airline, just under half the total amount owed.

The now-defunct national airline operated a points scheme whereby frequent flyers would be able to save up their miles travelled to eventually benefit from offers on future flights.

With Air Malta flying its last flight on 30th March, those points were not transferred to its successor’s own loyalty scheme, KM Malta Airline’s KM Rewards. Applications for KM Rewards are open but no information about the scheme have yet been communicated.

Members were promised that they would be compensated for any unused points. Information tabled in Parliament by Minister for Finance Clyde Caruana, whose portfolio includes responsibility for Air Malta, shows that the total amount to be claimed by Flypass members is €1.69 million.

Responding to a question from Opposition MP Chris Said, Minister Caruana said this amount “will only be paid out if all the scheme’s members send the information requested of them to Air Malta, which will handle all the payments itself.”

He also shared that from a total of 6,162 members, 5,716 have already been paid €882,000. Those who already claimed their compensation were given an average of €154 each.

With €808,000 left in the pot, the remaining 446 persons who have yet to claim their compensation stand to gain a far higher average payout – €1,811 – though this figure is likely skewed with the presence of a small number of very frequent flyers.

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