Chris Fearne

As of 21st February, primary contacts of COVID positive cases in Malta, for those with a valid vaccine certificate, will have their mandatory quarantine period reduced from seven days to five. On the fifth day, primary cases must produce a negative rapid test result, following which they can exit quarantine.

Deputy Prime Minister and Health Minister Chris Fearne made the announcement on Thursday afternoon.

He said that if the situation continues to appear under control, as is currently the case, 15 days after – on Monday 7th March, quarantine for primary contacts who have a valid vaccine certificate, will be removed entirely.

Additionally, on 7th March, positive cases, as well as primary contacts residing in the same household as the positive case, and who have a valid vaccine certificate, will see quarantine reduced from 10 days to seven, and must produce a negative rapid test result on the seventh day.

Fully vaccinated school children can go back to school after five days. From  7th March, children who have two doses and are primary contacts will not need to quarantine.

Minister Fearne announced that 79 per cent of adults aged 18 and over in Malta have officially received their booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

The Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Health Chris Fearne gives details on refunds for IVF medications.

The Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Health Chris Fearne gives details on refunds for IVF medications.

Posted by MaltaGov on Thursday, 17 February 2022

Dark Red Zones

Those entering Malta from countries classified as a dark red zone, will see quarantine reduced from 10 days to seven, from 7th March. They too must produce a negative rapid test on the seventh day.

The reduction of quarantine for Malta’s residents and for those coming from dark red zones, together those coming from dark red zones to work no longer having to quarantine at a designated hotel, at their own cost, is expected to soften staffing and recruitment woes for Malta’s employers.

Use of Masks

Currently, masks are not obligatory in public places for those with a valid vaccine certificate, in groups of up to two.

From 14th March, outdoors and in public places, masks will no longer be obligatory irrespective of vaccine status, except when large crowds are gathered, such as at a mass event.

Indoors, such as at workplaces, masks will continue to be obliged.

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